1946 Century Master View Camera on Semi-Centennial StandCentury Master View Camera

I don't limit myself to a single format or technology when it comes to the tools I use in the studio.  

I cover the range of 35mm full frame digital sensors to medium frame digital sensors and for larger formats I use 4x5 and 8x10 analog film cameras.  The negative or positive instant film is scanned in on a large format scanner for a digital dark room work flow.

For fast paced workflows or event photojournalism I use 35mm full frame digital cameras or where needed for sheer print size, a medium frame digital back.

For the traditional portrait I love using old film cameras combined with the stellar large format portrait lenses from the day for 4"x5 "or 8"x10" formats in addition to all the new digital tools.

The Century Master View Camera in the image at left dates from 1946 and is mounted on a Semi-Centennial stand with height adjustment and a means of changing the angle of the camera.

The lens attached to the lens board is a Bausch and Lomb 3A 16" Portrait lens with iris and soft focus adjustment.

This unit is fully functional and is equipped with an 8"x10" back with ground glass.  The 9"x9" lensboard allows for quick and easy lens changes.  Not unlike the current digital cameras, the dedicated portrait lenses from last century very much determine the rendition and atmosphere of the portrait.

All controls are manual necessitating a slow deliberate, well thought out workflow which actually helps with the composition.  The slower pace also works well for the sitter ... 

 

A second large format studio film camera is available in the Sinar P2 covering 4"x5" and 8"x10" for portrait and commercial photography assignments.  This unit is mounted on a studio pedestal with custom built two-way tripod head.

This particular camera model was launched in 1982 and has all bells and whistles when it comes to view camera features.  I use a Copal behind-the-lens shutter.  As such I can use modern Sinar large format lenses as well as various classic brass lenses from the 19th and 20th century.  Lens boards for the Sinar format can be used via an adaptor on other classic cameras as needed.